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Geology

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  • Tips for Database Searching

    • Keep your initial search simple—save limits (such as date ranges, scholarly, peer-reviewed, etc.) until you see the results list.

     

    • Look for common database tools (suggested subject headings, abstracts, citation help, emailing and save options) on the edges of the page, often in a color bar above the search boxes or in a separate frame on the right or left of your results list.

    • Use the right Boolean operator--usually AND--to link two search terms.  Using OR often results in a large number of unrelated (and less useful) results.  Using AND assures that both of your search terms will appear in the same document.

    Want more information about Boolean searching?

    Boolean Tutorial - Beginner

    Boolean Tutorial - Advanced

    ProQuest Central

    Questions about how to use ProQuest?  Take a look at these Helpful Videos.

    Scholarly vs. Popular Articles

    Periodical publications such as magazines, newspapers and journals vary in quality and depth of coverage. In your Psychology classes, your instructor will usually want you to select articles from scholarly journals (sometimes called "refereed" or "peer-reviewed" journals). This video offers some tips on how to tell a scholarly journal from a popular periodical. For more detail, try our guide to "Scholarly vs. Popular Works."

    Scholarly Articles vs. Popular Magazine Articles

    Periodical publications such as magazines, newspapers and journals vary in quality and depth of coverage. Instructors will frequently want you to select articles from scholarly journals (sometimes called "refereed" or "peer-reviewed" journals, though the terms don't mean exactly the same thing).

    Click the image or here to see a short (3min) video on how to tell the difference between scholarly articles and popular magazine articles.

    For more detail, try our guide to "Scholarly vs. Popular Works."

    Magazines vs Trade Journals vs Scholarly Journals

    Here's what to look for:

    CRITERIA POPULAR MAGAZINE TRADE JOURNAL SCHOLARLY JOURNAL
     

     

     

     

    Content Secondary discussion of someone else's research; may include personal narrative or opinion; general information, purpose is to entertain or inform. Current news, trends and products in a specific industry; practical information for professionals working in the field or industry. In-depth, primary account of original findings written by the researcher(s); very specific information, with the goal of scholarly communication.
    Author Author is frequently a journalist paid to write articles, may or may not have subject expertise. Author is usually a professional in the field, sometimes a journalist with subject expertise. Author's credentials are provided; usually a scholar or specialist with subject expertise.
    Audience General public; the interested non-specialist. Professionals in the field; the interested non-specialist. Scholars, researchers, and students.
    Language Vocabulary in general usage; easily understandable to most readers. Specialized terminology or jargon of the field, but not as technical as a scholarly journal. Specialized terminology or jargon of the field; requires expertise in subject area.
    Graphics Graphs, charts and tables; lots of glossy advertisements and photographs. Photographs; some graphics and charts; advertisements targeted to professionals in the field. Graphs, charts, and tables; very few advertisements and photographs.
    Layout & Organization Informal; may include non-standard formatting. May not present supporting evidence or a conclusion. Informal; articles organized like a journal or a newsletter. Evidence drawn from personal experience or common knowledge. Structured; includes the article abstract, goals and objectives, methodology, results (evidence), discussion, conclusion, and bibliography.
    Accountability Articles are evaluated by editorial staff, not experts in the field; edited for format and style. Articles are evaluated by editorial staff who may be experts in the field, not peer-reviewed*; edited for format and style. Articles are evaluated by peer-reviewers* or referees who are experts in the field; edited for content, format, and style.
    References Rare. Little, if any, information about source materials is given. Occasional brief bibliographies, but not required. Required. Quotes and facts are verifiable.
    Paging Each issue begins with page 1. Each issue generally begins with page 1. Page numbers are generally consecutive throughout the volume.

     

    DOAJ : Directory of Open Access Journals

    Aims & Scope

    The aim of the DOAJ is to increase the visibility and ease of use of open access scientific and scholarly journals, thereby promoting their increased usage and impact. The DOAJ aims to be comprehensive and cover all open access scientific and scholarly journals that use a quality control system to guarantee the content. In short, the DOAJ aims to be the one-stop shop for users of open access journals.

    Journal, Magazines ... What's the Difference ?

    Telling a magazine from a journal isn't always simple. When your instructor has specified use of a journal resource, review or print this two-page guide to help you choose.